French Macaron Recipe

How to make crispy, crunchy, chewy french macarons! Follow this recipe for tips on how to properly fold macaron batter, avoid hollow shells and other problems.
↓ Recipe ↓ Video Never Miss A Cake
Total Time: 1 hr 8 mins
Serves: 36 cookies
pink macarons stacked on a plate

How to make crispy, crunchy, chewy French macarons! This French macaron recipe is perfect for beginners who want to learn the basics of making the perfect macaron. Read through this entire blog post to learn everything you need to know about making the perfect macaron shell with puffy feet and no hollows with tons of tips on troubleshooting. Or if you’re in a hurry to get started, click the jump to recipe button.pink macarons stacked on a plate

I was first introduced to the French macaron (pronounced Mack-uh-rhone) back in pastry school. I had never had a cookie like this before. Soft and chewy in the middle but crisp on the outside. The way you make macaron shells is different than other cookies too. You don’t use any baking powder or even flour (yes they are gluten-free)!

Macarons get all their lift from whipped meringue which is then carefully folded into the almond flour and powdered sugar. The water in the egg whites turns to steam during baking which then lifts the shells and creates those dainty feet. This folding technique is called macaronage and is the trickiest part of making macarons. Follow my directions carefully and watch the video for nailing this folding technique.

The Different Types of Macarons

There are three different mixing methods for making macarons. The French method, the Italian method, and the Swiss method. This recipe is for French macarons but if you’re curious about the other styles, it’s good to learn about them. Try all the different styles to see which one works best for you. There isn’t any “best” way to make macarons, just the one that works the best for you and your environment.

These methods refer to the type of meringue you start with. French meringue is where you sprinkle the sugar into the egg whites while whipping, Italian meringue is where you heat up the sugar on the stove and pour it into whipping egg whites, and Swiss meringue is where egg whites and sugar are warmed over a simmering pot of water until the sugar dissolves and then whipped.plate of pink macarons lined up in a circle

The French macaron method is the most common for beginners because you do not have to have a candy thermometer or handle hot sugar. This method is great for just learning how to fold your batter properly, identify when to stop mixing, and practice your piping skills. The batter is more prone to over-folding but with the addition of powdered egg whites, your batter is less prone to spreading and overmixing.

The Swiss method is the least used method because, for just a little more effort, you can make Italian macarons that are more stable. Swiss macarons are more stable than French-style macarons but not by much because the sugar is just dissolved, not cooked to a high temperature. The Italian method is the most common method amongst professional macaron chefs because it produces the most consistent and stable macaron shells.

French Macaron Ingredientsbowls of ingredients and tools for macarons

Egg whites are the main ingredient for making a French macaron. I recommend using fresh egg whites that have been aged in the fridge for 2-4 days. This allows some of the moisture to evaporate from the egg whites and causes the tight proteins in the egg whites to relax. Relaxed protein means stronger meringue that is less prone to over-mixing and cracking. *Make sure you don’t get any egg yolk into the whites or it can cause your meringue to collapse and there is no way to save it if that happens. Boxed egg whites are not recommended for making macarons because they don’t whip up enough. Once you get more comfortable with making macarons, you may find that you no longer need to use aged egg whites.

Almond flour is the other ingredient needed to make perfect macarons. Almond flour is finely ground almonds. I like the brand from bobs red mill. Almond flour is different from almond meal so make sure you get the right kind.

Powdered sugar is what will make our macarons sweet and creates that crispy shell out the outside of the macaron shell.

Granulated sugar is added to whipping egg whites to create structure and causes the shell to form as well. Some pastry chefs prefer superfine sugar for a shinier macaron shell but it’s not necessary.

Food coloring is needed to color your French macaron shells. I prefer to use powdered food coloring so that the extra liquid from the food coloring does not throw off these delicate cookies but if all you have is gel food coloring that is ok too. Just don’t use that super liquid food color from the grocery store because it will make your batter runny.

This recipe uses vanilla extract for flavoring but you can use any liquid flavoring that you desire. You may have to adjust the flavoring amounts depending on how strong you want the flavor to be. Keep in mind you will also get flavor from the filling you choose.

Cream of tartar is an acid that helps your meringue batter keep its stability and prevents over-whipping. It’s not 100% necessary but it does help!

Powdered egg whites can help strengthen your egg whites to prevent over-mixing. Again, not 100% necessary but it does help when you’re a beginner.

Tools and Equipment

Kitchen scale – This is a must. Some recipes can be converted to cups without too many problems but this is not one of them. Exact measurements are required. You can get a kitchen scale at most department stores or this one from OXO that I like.

Glass or metal bowl – Plastic bowls hold onto fat particles which can interfere with your batter.

Stand mixer or electric hand mixer – This is necessary for mixing your meringue. You could do it by hand but your arm would probably fall off before you got your meringue mixed enough.

Sifter – This isn’t absolutely necessary but if you want very shiny and smooth macaron shells, you’ll want to sift your almond and powdered sugar.

Food Processor – Necessary for shiny and smooth macarons. Not necessary but if you don’t use it, your macaron shells will be a bit lumpier.

Pastry bag and medium round piping tip – You will need these to pipe your macaron shells. The exact size of the piping tip isn’t super important, but I typically use an Ateco 804-806.

Parchment Paper or silicone mat (not wax paper) – I have personally found that parchment paper works best for me when piping out my macaron shells. The paper allows for even baking and they release easily from the paper.

Two baking sheet pans – You want to pipe all of your macaron batter at once. It will not keep if you leave it in the bowl for too long after mixing.

How to Make French Macarons

Before You Begin

  1. Age your egg whites 2-4 days ahead of making your macarons. Crack and separate the eggs and store the whites in a container covered in plastic wrap.
  2. Take your egg whites out of the fridge 2-3 hours in advance. Room-temperature egg whites whip up better than cold egg whites.
  3. Begin by wiping your bowls, whisk, and tools down with some white vinegar. This will remove every trace of oil from the surface and help ensure the perfect macaron.hands cleaning a whisk with a paper towel
  4. Preheat your oven to 300ºF (148ºC).
  5. Trim the parchment paper to the size of your pan so that it fits perfectly inside.
  6. Place the macaron template under the parchment or make your own template by tracing circles that are roughly 1.5″ wide and spaced about 1″ apart. Turn the parchment over so that the marker does not transfer to your cookies.baking tray lined with parchment paper and macaron templates
  7. Measure out all your ingredients carefully using a food scale and set them aside. Having your ingredients ready to go will help ensure success.

Making French Macaron Batter

  1. Place your dry ingredients (almond flour, powdered sugar, and salt) into your food processor. Process for 5-second increments, three times. Shake the container as needed to ensure even mixing.powdered sugar and almond flour in a food processor bowlfood processor full of macaron dry ingredients
  2. Place your strainer over a large bowl.hands placing a strainer over a glass bowl
  3. Sift the almond flour mixture to remove any large bits of almond. If you have to remove a lot, make sure to add the same amount of almond flour back in so that your batter ratio is not thrown off.hands pushing dry ingredients through a sifter with a spatula
  4. Place your egg whites, cream of tartar, and meringue powder into the bowl of your stand mixer with the whisk attachment attached.egg whites pouring into a stand mixer bowl
  5. Begin whisking your egg whites on medium speed until they are foamy. Medium speed will produce smaller, stronger air bubbles than whipping at high speed.foamy egg mixture in a metal bowl
  6. Sprinkle in the granulated sugar slowly until it’s all added and continue whisking on medium until you reach stiff peaks. hand sprinkling a bowl of sugar into a bowl of whipping egg whites.hand holding a whisk of meringue at a stiff peak
  7. Finally add the vanilla and mix until combined. hand adding a small bowl of vanilla to meringue
  8. Add your meringue to the dry ingredients and begin using the “J fold” method by making a line down the center of your mixture with the rubber spatula and then up and to the left of the bowl. Rotate the bowl 90º and repeat this “J fold” for 10 strokes.meringue in a bowl of dry macaron ingredients
  9. Add your food coloring in at this point. Remember, a little goes a long way. Fold two more times.bowl of half mixed macaron batter with a pink drop of food coloring in the center
  10. Begin testing your batter after stroke 12 for readiness by lifting the spatula out of the bowl to see how the batter runs off the spatula. If the batter stays clumped or does not fall off the spatula, fold it one more time and test again.spatula folding macaron batter in a bowl
  11. Repeat this process until the batter falls off the spatula in a “V” shape. Another test you can do is to firmly bang your bowl onto the counter to see if the batter settles into itself. If it does, it’s ready. If it doesn’t move it still needs more mixing. Some pastry chefs recommend making a figure 8 with the batter to test readiness but I find this often causes overmixing so looking for the “V” is a safer option.spatula holding macaron batter oozing in a v shape
  12. Prepare your piping bag with a 1/2″ round piping tip by cutting the end of the piping bag off and inserting the tip into the bag.
  13. Twist the piping tip and bag together to seal the bottom of the piping bag and then press the bag into the tip so that the filling does not leak out of the piping bag.finger pressing a pastry bag into a piping tip
  14. Fold the top of the piping bag down over your hand and scoop the macaron batter into the piping bag with a rubber spatula. Or you can place the piping bag into a tall glass so both your hands are free.pouring pink macaron batter into a pastry bag
  15. Lay the bag flat on the counter and push all the batter to the bottom of the piping bag so there are no air bubbles and then twist the top to prevent leaking. Tie the top into a knot if desired.pastry bag filled with macaron batter laying on a table
  16. When ready to pipe, pull the piping tip out and move the batter down into the piping tip by squeezing the batter gently. Pro-tip: When you are not piping, hold the piping bag straight up to prevent leaking. When ready to pipe turn the bag over and immediately begin piping.hand holding a piping bag filled with macaron batter facing up

Piping the Macarons

Piping macarons for the first time can take some practice but don’t worry, even if they don’t look perfect they will still taste just as delicious! Always eat the evidence I say.

  1. Hold the piping bag straight up and down over a circle, about 1″ away from the prepared baking sheets.
  2. Begin squeezing, do not rotate or move your bag.
  3. The piping tip opening should be touching the macaron at all times.
  4. Stop piping just inside the circle (at the dotted line if you’re using my template).pastry bag full of macaron batter piping circles on a baking sheet
  5. Make a small quick “C” circular motion with the tip to remove it from the piped cookie. Try not to just lift up because this will leave little peaks on top of your cookies.
  6. After all your macarons are piped, lift your pan up about 6″ and drop it onto your work surface a few times. This helps pop any large bubbles that may have got trapped in your batter pop so they don’t crack your macarons. hands holding a baking sheet of unbaked macarons 6" above a table
  7. Use a needle or toothpick to fix any bubbles if you still have some. hand holding a needle above unbaked macarons
  8. Don’t forget to remove the templates under the parchment paper before baking.
  9. Allow the macarons to sit at room temperature for 15-30 minutes to develop a “skin” on them before baking. You should be able to lightly touch the top of the cookie and the batter will not stick to your finger. Do not leave your macarons out to dry for longer than 30 minutes or the shell can get too thick and your macaron shells won’t develop feet.finger touching the top of a rested unbaked macaron
  10. Remove the template and place a small dab of macaron batter under the corner of each piece of parchment paper to keep it from blowing all over the place in the oven.hands piping a dot of macaron batter in the corner of a baking sheet
  11. Bake the macarons in the oven at 300ºF for 10 minutes. Rotate the pan after 5 minutes to promote even baking as well as let some of the steam out of the oven which helps to prevent cracking.hand in a an oven mitt rotating a baking tray in the oven
  12. Test one macaron by gently lifting it from the parchment paper with a knife. If it releases, your macarons are done. If it’s sticking, continue baking and check every minute until they release.knife lifting a macaron off a baking tray
  13. Remove the baking tray from the oven and pull the parchment off the pan by sliding it gently onto a wire rack so that your macarons do not continue to bake.hands moving a sheet of parchment paper with baked macarons onto a wire rack

Making Ganache Filling

This is to make a very basic white chocolate ganache filling using cream. You can use this same ratio to make fruit puree ganache by replacing the cream with a puree such as raspberry, lemon, passion fruit, etc. You can also add extracts to your ganache. Get creative with your flavors! This is the best way to experiment with the flavors of macarons without messing with the ingredients of the macaron shells.

  1. Combine your chocolate and cream together in a microwave-safe bowl.container pouring cream into a bowl of chopped white chocolate
  2. Heat the mixture for one minute then whisk together.
  3. Continue heating the mixture in 30-second increments until the chocolate is melted and everything is mixed together smoothly. Add white food coloring if you want the ganache to be more transparent.hand mixing white chocolate ganache with a whisk
  4. Add the butter and vanilla, then stir together until it’s melted and combined.block of butter in a bowl of white chocolate ganache
  5. Place the ganache into a piping bag and flatten the mixture out until it is pretty thin.pastry bag of white chocolate ganache flat on a table
  6. Place the ganache into the freezer for about 10 minutes to help it set up.
  7. Push the ganache to the end of the piping bag with a bowl scraper.hand pushing ganache in a pastry bag with a bench scraper
  8. Cut a small 1/8″ hole in the bottom of the piping bag and begin filling your macaron shells with the ganache.piping white chocolate ganache onto the bottom shell of a macaron
  9. Place a second shell on top and now your macarons are complete!hands sandwiching a macaron

Troubleshooting Macaron Problems

If you are having problems with your macarons, take a look at some of the troubleshooting techniques below to see if you can fix the issue. Remember to only try one fix at a time so if it works, you know what you changed. Try not to attempt different flavor combinations until you’ve mastered a base recipe that works for you. All of these suggestions are based on the assumption that you have measured your ingredients properly using a kitchen scale.

FAQ

Can I convert this recipe to cups?

This macaron recipe works best with exact measurements, so you must use a food scale.

How do I fix hollow macaron shells?

– Hollow shells can be from egg whites that are not aged, therefore the protein structure is not strong enough to make a proper shell. Age your egg whites for at least 48 hours or be sure to add the meringue powder to strengthen your shells.
– Another cause could be trapped air before baking. Be sure you bang your tray a couple of times to release any trapped bubbles in the macarons before baking.
– The oven temperature could be too hot. Decrease the temperature by 25 degrees the next time you bake.
– Improper mixing. Make sure you are mixing your batter to the correct consistency

Why don’t my macarons have feet?

– Undermixing can be the cause of no development of feet. Make sure you are mixing your batter to the proper consistency before piping.
– Oven temperature can cause your shells to dry out before they fully bake. Use an oven thermometer to make sure your oven isn’t running hot or cold. If the temperature is too low, increase the temperature by 25 degrees the next time you bake.

Why are my macarons delicate and wrinkled?

Your macarons will be wrinkly on top if they haven’t rested long enough after piping. Or if your oven temperature is too low.

Why did my macarons crack on top?

– The egg whites could have been whipped for too long. Try whipping a little less or use aged egg whites.
– You over-folded the macaron batter. Make sure you stop mixing when your batter forms a “V” as it falls off the spatula.
Improper mixing. Make sure you use the “J fold” method and use sifted ingredients.
– The oven temperature is too hot. Make sure you check your oven temperature with a thermometer and rotate your macarons halfway through baking.
– The macaron shells did not develop a skin before baking. Make sure you test your macaron shells with your finger to see if a skin has formed before baking.

How do you store macarons?

Macarons taste even better after they have been refrigerated. The interiors turn wonderfully chewy and the flavors have time to develop. Place your finished macarons into an airtight container and keep them in the fridge for up to a week. You can freeze your macarons for a long time and just take them out of the freezer whenever you have the desire to enjoy your tasty homemade macarons.

Strawberry Macarons

Chocolate Macarons

Pistachio Macarons

Lemon Shortbread Cookies

Did You Make This Recipe?Leave a rating and tell me how it went!
pink macarons stacked on a plate

French Macaron Recipe

How to make crispy, crunchy, chewy french macarons! Follow this recipe for tips on how to properly fold macaron batter, avoid hollow shells and other problems.
4.96 from 154 votes
Print Rate Never Miss A Cake
Prep Time: 20 mins
Cook Time: 15 mins
Resting time: 20 mins
Total Time: 1 hr 8 mins
Serves: 36 cookies
Calories: 99kcal

Ingredients

  • 4 ounces (113 g) almond flour
  • 8 ounces (227 g) powdered sugar
  • 4 ounces (113 g) egg whites aged overnight in the fridge and brought to room temperature
  • 1/4 tsp (1/4 tsp) cream of tartar
  • 1/2 teaspoon meringue powder optional
  • 2 ounces (57 g) granulated sugar super fine
  • 1 teaspoon (1/2 tsp) vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 drop gel food coloring optional

White Chocolate Ganache

  • 7 ounces (200 g) white chocolate
  • 4 ounces (120 g) heavy cream
  • 1.5 ounces (45 g) unsalted butter
  • 1 whole vanilla bean or 1 tsp extract

Equipment

  • Food Scale
  • Stand Mixer
  • Sifter
  • Parchment Paper
  • Piping Bag
  • 802 Round Piping Tip
  • Food processor

Instructions

Before you Begin

  • Age your egg whites 2-4 days ahead of making your macarons. Crack and separate the eggs and store the whites in a container covered in plastic wrap.
  • Take your egg whites out of the fridge 2-3 hours in advance. Room-temperature egg whites whip up better than cold egg whites.
  • Begin by wiping your bowls, whisk, and tools down with some white vinegar. This will remove every trace of oil from the surface and help ensure the perfect macaron.
  • Preheat your oven to 300ºF (148ºC).
  • Trim the parchment paper to the size of your pan so that it fits perfectly inside.
  • Place the macaron template under the parchment or make your own template by tracing circles that are roughly 1.5" wide and spaced about 1" apart. Turn the parchment over so that the marker does not transfer to your cookies.
  • Measure out all your ingredients carefully using a food scale and set them aside. Having your ingredients ready to go will help ensure success.

Making the Macaron Batter

  • Place your dry ingredients (almond flour, powdered sugar, and salt) into your food processor. Process for 5-second increments, three times. Shake the container as needed to ensure even mixing.
  • Place your strainer over a large bowl.
  • Sift the almond flour mixture to remove any large bits of almond. If you have to remove a lot, make sure to add the same amount of almond flour back in so that your batter ratio is not thrown off.
  • Place your egg whites, cream of tartar, and meringue powder into the bowl of your stand mixer with the whisk attachment attached.
  • Begin whisking your egg whites on medium speed until you reach soft peaks. Medium speed will produce smaller, stronger air bubbles than whipping at high speed.
  • Sprinkle in the granulated sugar slowly until it's all added and continue whisking on medium until you reach stiff peaks.
  • Finally, add the vanilla and mix until combined.
  • Add your meringue to the dry ingredients and begin using the "J fold" method by making a line down the center of your mixture with the rubber spatula and then up and to the left of the bowl. Rotate the bowl 90º and repeat this "J fold" for 10 strokes.
  • Add your food coloring in at this point. Remember, a little goes a long way. Fold two more times.
  • Begin testing your batter after stroke 12 for readiness by lifting the spatula out of the bowl to see how the batter runs off the spatula. If the batter stays clumped or does not fall off the spatula, fold it one more time and test again.
  • Repeat this process until the batter falls off the spatula in a "V" shape. Another test you can do is to firmly bang your bowl onto the counter to see if the batter settles into itself. If it does, it's ready. If it doesn't move it still needs more mixing. Some pastry chefs recommend making a figure 8 with the batter to test readiness but I find this often causes overmixing so looking for the "V" is a safer option.
  • Prepare your piping bag with a 1/2" round piping tip by cutting the end of the piping bag off and inserting the tip into the bag.
  • Twist the piping tip and bag together to seal the bottom of the piping bag and then press the bag into the tip so that the filling does not leak out of the piping bag.
  • Fold the top of the piping bag down over your hand and scoop the macaron batter into the piping bag with a rubber spatula. Or you can place the piping bag into a tall glass so both your hands are free.
  • Lay the bag flat on the counter and push all the batter to the bottom of the piping bag so there are no air bubbles and then twist the top to prevent leaking. Tie the top into a knot if desired.
  • When ready to pipe, pull the piping tip out and move the batter down into the piping tip by squeezing the batter gently. Pro-tip: When you are not piping, hold the piping bag straight up to prevent leaking. When ready to pipe turn the bag over and immediately begin piping.

Piping the Macarons

  • Hold the piping bag straight up and down over a circle, about 1" away from the prepared baking sheets.
  • Begin squeezing, do not rotate or move your bag.
  • The piping tip opening should be touching the macaron at all times.
  • Stop piping just inside the circle (at the dotted line if you're using my template).
  • Make a small quick "C" circular motion with the tip to remove it from the piped cookie. Try not to just lift up because this will leave little peaks on top of your cookies.
  • After all your macarons are piped, lift your pan up about 6" and drop it onto your work surface a few times. This helps pop any large bubbles that may have got trapped in your batter pop so they don't crack your macarons.
  • Use a needle or toothpick to fix any bubbles if you still have some.
  • Don't forget to remove the templates under the parchment paper before baking.
  • Allow the macarons to sit at room temperature for 15-30 minutes to develop a "skin" on them before baking. You should be able to lightly touch the top of the cookie and the batter will not stick to your finger. Do not leave your macarons out to dry for longer than 30 minutes or the shell can get too thick and your macaron shells won't develop feet.
  • Remove the template and place a small dab of macaron batter under the corner of each piece of parchment paper to keep it from blowing all over the place in the oven.
  • Bake the macarons in the oven at 300ºF for 10 minutes. Rotate the pan after 5 minutes to promote even baking as well as let some of the steam out of the oven which helps to prevent cracking.
  • Test one macaron by gently lifting it from the parchment paper with a knife. If it releases, your macarons are done. If it's sticking, continue baking and check every minute until they release.
  • Remove the baking tray from the oven and pull the parchment off the pan by sliding it gently onto a wire rack so that your macarons do not continue to bake.

Making White Chocolate Ganache

  • Combine your chocolate and cream together in a microwave-safe bowl.
  • Heat the mixture for one minute then whisk together.
  • Continue heating the mixture in 30-second increments until the chocolate is melted and everything is mixed together smoothly.
  • Add the butter and vanilla, then stir together until it's melted and combined.
  • Place the ganache into a piping bag and flatten the mixture out until it is pretty thin.
  • Place the ganache into the freezer for about 10 minutes to help it set up.
  • Push the ganache to the end of the piping bag with a bowl scraper.
  • Cut a small 1/8" hole in the bottom of the piping bag and begin filling your macaron shells with the ganache.
  • Place a second shell on top and now your macarons are complete!

Notes

  1. Egg whites are the main ingredient for making a French macaron. I recommend using fresh egg whites that have been aged in the fridge for 2-4 days. This allows some of the moisture to evaporate from the egg whites and causes the tight proteins in the egg whites to relax. Relaxed protein means stronger meringue that is less prone to over-mixing and cracking.
  2. Almond flour is different from almond meal so make sure you get the right kind.
  3. Some pastry chefs prefer superfine granulated sugar for a shinier macaron shell but regular sugar will work as well.
  4. Cream of tartar is an acid that helps your meringue batter keep its stability and prevents over-whipping. It’s not 100% necessary but it does help!
  5. Powdered egg whites can help strengthen your egg whites to prevent over-mixing. Again, not 100% necessary but it does help when you’re a beginner.
  6. A kitchen scale is a must. Some recipes can be converted to cups without too many problems but this is not one of them. Exact measurements are required. You can get a kitchen scale at most department stores.
  7. Stand mixer or electric hand mixer – This is necessary for mixing your meringue. You could do it by hand but your arm would probably fall off before you got your meringue mixed enough.
  8. Glass or metal bowl – Plastic bowls hold onto fat particles which can interfere with your batter.
  9. Pastry bag and medium round piping tip – You will need these to pipe your macaron shells. The exact size of the piping tip isn’t super important, but I typically use an Ateco 804-806.
  10. Parchment Paper or silicone mat (not wax paper) – I have personally found that parchment paper works best for me when piping out my macaron shells. The paper allows for even baking and they release easily from the paper.
  11. Two baking sheet pans – You want to pipe all of your macaron batter at once. It will not keep if you leave it in the bowl for too long after mixing.

Nutrition

Serving: 1cookie | Calories: 99kcal (5%) | Carbohydrates: 12g (4%) | Protein: 1g (2%) | Fat: 5g (8%) | Saturated Fat: 3g (15%) | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Trans Fat: 0.04g | Cholesterol: 7mg (2%) | Sodium: 27mg (1%) | Potassium: 28mg (1%) | Fiber: 0.3g (1%) | Sugar: 11g (12%) | Vitamin A: 77IU (2%) | Vitamin C: 0.05mg | Calcium: 20mg (2%) | Iron: 0.1mg (1%)
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177 comments on “French Macaron Recipe

  1. I read that the powdered sugar needs to be pure and free of corn starch. I can’t find any where I live. Can it be the kind with corn starch?

  2. Hi there, I’ve tried your recipe and failed dismally. Is the powdered sugar/ almond meal ratio correct? Every other recipe I’ve seen has equally quantities of both. I’m just curious why yours is double ??‍♀️

    1. This is the recipe from pastry school so I don’t know exactly why the ratios are the way that they are. I know that it works though because I use it all the time and many of my readers do as well. If you let me know what went wrong, perhaps I can help you 🙂

  3. My macarons were stuck to the parchment paper. Please help!

  4. thank you so much for the clear guide!
    can i leave out the cream of tartar, or is it important?

    1. The cream of tartar helps the egg whites hold their strength so if you can use it, your chances of them turning out is higher 🙂

  5. ok, first time baker. my daughter wants to be a pastry chef and is making these for her class. she’s 10. the recipe is on oz. is there a substitute for cups and tsp? Also, I loved the step my step instructions just confused about what are feet? She needs these for tomorrow, can she let the eggs sit on the counter and use them later today?

    1. Hi Becky, macarons are very very picky. Even when you weigh everything to the gram, they still might turn out. Weighing ingredients is absolutely necessary for macarons in this case. Feet are the little bits of the macaron that appear when they are baking. Most people need to try making macarons 3-4 times before they have success so prepare yourself that your first batch might not even turn out. Eggs should be left in the fridge, uncovered. Good luck!

  6. 5 stars
    I just made these yesterday. I was surprised at how easy and yummy they were. I have had them before and never liked them, I just wanted to learn something new and I was so delightfully surprised at the amazing flavor of fresh macarons. Thank you Liz for making it so easy. I love watching your tutorials. I’ve learned so much. My mom said they were the best things I ever made. lol

  7. I am planning to make strawberry macarons using freeze-dried strawberries. I know, I need to process it till fine, my question is, how much do I use of it in the macaron mixture itself and do I add it at the same time as the almond flour and sugar?

  8. 5 stars
    absolutely recommend, these are foolproof, I used grainy almond flour cause it was homemade and I couldn’t get it any finer than one-millimeter bits, I used cold egg whites because I was in a bit of a rush, I used liquid food coloring, I couldn’t get the eggs to soft peaks, let alone stiff peaks. and it worked. the macrons grew feet and became something resembling macrons. the texture wasn’t bad either.

  9. 5 stars
    I just want to say thank you Liz for this awesome tutorial! I nailed it on my first try and was so happy that I made three more flavors. They all turned out great and taste amazing!!! Thank you so much for all your help and easy to follow tutorials!!!

  10. I’m in the midst of making these and I was wondering about how long does it take to mix the almond flour/powdered sugar mixture into the egg white mixture? Also wanted to know if it’s possible to over mix the batter?

    1. It varies with each batch. The only way to know when its ready is to look for the ribbon stage and yes, you can definitely over-mix or undermix. This is a very finicky cookie

  11. Hello!
    So to do the egg aging, first i crack my 2 eggs and put the egg whites in a bowl. Then i leave in the fridge for 24 hr uncovered, and then take them out and bring them to room temp. Is that how?

  12. When using frozen mac shells, how do you recommend thawing them? Should you leave them in an airtight container while they come to room temp to avoid condensation? Or is this not really a worry?

  13. 4 stars
    Easy to follow. But help our macaroons got stuck to the wax paper! Any suggestions please. I wanna try again with my mom.

  14. What brand and type of Almond flour do you suggest?

  15. 5 stars
    Mine turned out beautifully! This was my first time. I followed your recipe to a T. Thanks so much!!

  16. 5 stars
    Fun to make! Not easy, but if an 11 year old can do it I’m sure you can too!

  17. Hi! my macarons were looking so nice in the oven. perfect shape and gloss and feet. But the wouldn’t get to point where they weren’t stuck. SO I over cooked them trying to make them done. They were just puffs with a chewy bottom and a super flaky crust with a lot of air in between. I let the egg whites sit for 36 hours and the macarons for almost an hour before baking. Any tips?

    1. Most likely your meringue was not mixed enough so your cookies were still too “wet”. Don’t be afraid to mix the meringue for longer 🙂

  18. There are two types of Bobs Red mill almond flour, which one is better to use?

  19. 3 stars
    My macarons did not turn out right at all. I blended the almond flour and powdered sugar. The batter fell in the figure 8 spiral just like you said it should. I didn’t have them on the sheet as nice circles (I’m not very good at using a piping bag yet, I regret not using your outline) but they were still around the size you said they should be. They were in the oven for about 15 minutes, and came off the sheet very easily and were lightly brown. The problem is that the shells turned out completely flat, and were kinda crisp. They made a satisfying sound when I cracked them in half. They were not the nice raised shells you would expect. I was wondering if you could tell me where I went wrong? If I could post a picture here I would to show you how they looked.

    1. Sounds like your meringue was not whipped enough if you did not get any feet. A common problem in making macarons 🙂 You can always join my Sugar Geek FB group to post photos and get feedback.

  20. 5 stars
    I have tried other french macaron recipes before but this one is perfect! I did not leave my eggs whites overnight in the fridge, rather I took them out for 30 minutes prior to using. I also did not have any cream of tartar or hard cream so I left that out of the recipe. It turned out perfect, and tasted IDENTICAL to the ones I have bought from outside.

    My only advice is that in order for it not to burn, bake for less than 15 minutes. I baked mine for 10 minutes and they were perfect. Gently peel off the parchment paper a minute after removing from the oven.

    Thanks for the wonderful recipe! 🙂

  21. Why is my batter so thin. I piped them into circles and then they just melted into weird shapes. What happened? 😞

  22. How long should eggs sit in the counter for room temp? Ive tried to make macarons 4 times and each time I fail. The fourth time Im sure I did something wrong with my egg whites because the batter was too thick and would not soften at all! I want to cryyyy 😢 the meringue was nice and glossy. But maybe they didnt rest a lot.

    1. Make sure you are using a scale and not changing any of the ingredients. Don’t be too frustrated, making macraons are very difficult for everyone.

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